How far can it be argued that the activities of the Ku Klux Klan was the most important obstacle to the achievements of Civil Rights for Black people up to 1941

Topics: Black people, Race and Ethnicity, White people Pages: 3 (925 words) Published: February 11, 2015
How far can it be argued that the activities of the Ku Klux Klan was the most important obstacle to the achievements of Civil Rights for Black people up to 1941?

Many obstacles -such as Jim Crow Laws, the Supreme Court decision and lack of political influence- prevented Black Americans from gaining equal rights up to 1941. However, the biggest obstacle they faced was that of the Ku Klux Klan; an intimidating, influential and secret organisation and its only concern was White supremacy. The KKK was founded in the 1860s to stop Blacks from achieving equal rights. They would terrorise anyone who wasn’t a part of the W.A.S.P way of life but they specifically targeted Black people, the Klan would torture and beat people. They still saw Blacks as slaves and therefore regarded them as second class citizens. The Klan was a secret organisation and so no-one knew exactly how many members there actually were, but it was estimated at around 3 million members by 1925 and a large number of members worked in law enforcement or in very politically powerful positions. This meant that it wasn’t difficult to stop any laws being passed that might have helped Blacks to secure Civil rights. Jim Crow laws, designed to maintain white superiority and completely legal, were another big reason that prevented Blacks from gaining Civil rights. White people had always been in power and thought of Blacks as inferior to them, so they imposed laws which kept Black and White people separate. For example, White and Black children were not to attend the same schools. This caused a division between the Black community as some began to believe that they really were inferior to the White race and shouldn’t have the same privileges whereas others were completely outraged by these laws. In 1896 the Supreme Court decided that it didn’t matter if Whites and Blacks were segregated as long as equal facilities were provided. When challenged, the Supreme Court said "Laws which keep the races...
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